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Boomer Part 2: Cooked Meat and Calcium

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Thanks Jesse for explaining exactly why the calcium is needed with raw meat. It seems then to me that if you feed cooked meat (as some people do) you would still need calcium?

Jesse's Answer

Yes, pets eating cooked meat need calcium too. The only problem is that cooked meat shuts down the acid production in the stomach. It has been said that carnivores produce up to 15 times more hydrochloric acid in their stomach than we humans. This is to help break down the meat (protein), bones, skin, fur, feathers, etc but the high level of hydrochloric acid also kills bad bacteria.

But when you feed cooked meat, the body says Oh, it's cooked and any bacteria has been killed. So there is no need to produce as much acid now.

The problem then becomes that without the strong acid, the calcium cannot be absorbed.

Calcium needs acid to be taken out of the solid state and into solution. Just like if you have a tea pot with calcium deposits, the secret is to rinse the tea pot with water and vinegar. The acid of the vinegar takes the calcium back into solution and so when you dump the water, the calcium deposits go too leaving a clean tea pot.

Without the acid in the body, the calcium cannot be absorbed by our pets causing the body to create calcium deposits.

So the problem is, if you feed cooked meat, the body still needs calcium but if you feed or give calcium, then you will create calcium deposits. So now you have two problems when feeding cooked meat... a lack of calcium because the body cannot utilize the calcium or absorb the calcium in the food... and the second problem then becomes calcium deposits.

You can still get calcium deposits in dogs or cats eating raw meat as they get older and their digestive system gets weaker. That's just the reality of aging.

But many pets who have calcium deposits, once they begin to eat raw meat see the calcium deposits go away. Ultimately, calcium deposits indicate a weak digestive system and/or an unhealthy form of calcium.

  1. Boomer: Part 1
  2. Boomer: Part 2
  3. Boomer: Part 3
  4. Boomer: Part 4

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